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20130318
20130326
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 5:00pm EDT
. >> coming up on c-span2, the fbi's top lawyer on how law-enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. then "the communicators" with commissioner robert mcdowell. >> the nation's highest court is holding oral arguments this week on to gay marriage cases. the first people got in line thursday, and now the going rate for saving a seat is around $6000. a couple weeks ago director rob reiner explained why this is drawing such interest. here's a portion of what he had to say. >> one of the reasons we took on proposition eight, aside from the obvious reasons of marriage equality and we should all be treated as equal under the law and its, it was a bad initiative, and you know, the courts of our it overturned. we hope the supreme court will uphold those. those rulings. but it was partly an education process. we discover as we go along that, first of all, there's not one person in this audience, or anywhere, that doesn't have a gay person in the family o
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 1:40am EDT
possibility it was lost to history under which the fbi was dispatched. the problem is the people who did not speak german or spanish and did not know much about the country's so what did they do? they did what many of us would do, you get your expense account and offer money for information you go to the chief of police and say where are the nazis? that system was riddled with corruption wear a button american dictators realized if you want the nazis this fellow is take him away. i can take his land and returned 4,000 people of german origin and put them in the campaign in texas. what i discovered in the archival records than camp commanders said who are you sending us? their spanish speakers, old men, i found 80 jews who fled germany for asylum then picked up because somebody heard him speaking german and put in a camp? some already knew what it was like to live behind barbed wire by being in a concentration camp. it was a precursor to guantanamo that we operate today. the use of bounty hunters and local sources to ground the people they suspect that they call terrorists that are locked up
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 8:30am EDT
fbi arrest in nsa? secondly i want to ask about china human rights issue, you know, -- [inaudible] and china have forced abortion every year. and china -- [inaudible] -- organ transplant a couple thousand a year. number two country of the world. just very large human rights issue. i hope you can talk about the human rights issue, let's more talk about economic trade with china. >> i think that both issues are important. it is important to economically engage china. i think of evolution in terms of human rights is partly dependent upon what we do to put information into china about what's happening on the ground in china in real-time in order to expose these types of abuses. and that is best done through radio free asia. but it is also done to other legislation that we have enacted in which we have an institution year on the hill that -- and i'm a member of the hearings that we hold on this issue, which elevate human rights, and which he gets that information out into the international press. so it's partly getting the information out to the international press. it's partly through
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 1:30pm EDT
at each other, fbi is there, atf. the sheriff's office of mayor. the d.a. and everybody is unhappy. and he says, okay, he puts a cell phone in the middle of the table and says they are. and as soon as she said it, everybody knew that raymond was their guy and he was in handcuffs by that night. six days after the fire. that is unheard of in an arson investigation. the arsonist is long gone. how are you going to catch them? it's dark, it's night, there's no cameras or nothing. these are the guys who did it and put it all together. and here are the captains who testified. i like this picture. and look at chris. the sun is right in his face. i should've had everybody move into the shade. walker is in the background and i should've had him in it as well and i forgot to do that. this is a great metaphor. here he is in the background and he came to the fire afterwards. always there someone in the background. this is raymond squeeze. this is where they lived at apartments, very nice blue collar gated community. she said that he was there with their child. diamond bell. as in diamonds strik
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 7:45pm EDT
were also concerned antipoor the possibility begin a program lost in history under which the fbi was dispatched to find dangerous nazis. the problem is the people who resent to speak or know about countries with a recess to by bad guys. so they did what any of us would do. he stared presence and offer many two people for information. that openness is to rebuild with corruption, were that american dictators quickly realized you wanted the nazis. this poster meant i was a farm. take them away. then i can take his land. if the enemy camp in texas as suspect the nazis. bu
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 11:30am EDT
it would washington to talk with the fbi and interpoll and the cia, talk national intelligence agency and the homeland security. by the time bloomberg was mayor and ray kelly was police chief. they came back and said to ray kelly and the mayor, it's not useful. we have been for a couple of years in washington and we have learned almost nothing. a lot of bureaucracy, gossip, hard information. the agencies often don't talk to each other. they are competing with one another. washington, d.c., isn't a great place to gather intel on terrorist operations around the world. so ray kelly with bloomberg's support had an idea. why don't we redeploy the new york intel squad to global cities one by one? one to singapore, one to frankfurt, one to hong kong, one to rio, send them to the places where we are likely to get valuable information. let them coordinate and cooperate with the intel unit in other cities around the world. let do city to city security intelligence gathering. for the last seven or eighth or nine years that's what new york city has been doing. i can't say i'm not a security exper
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 8:00am EDT
police working with the fbi. and organizations like the urban league and the naacp turn out in force in protest. here's on the top a rally in new york, on the bottom limo, ohio. who knew that was a national community that would combat fascism? lima, ohio. here's washington d.c. detroit on the top. new orleans, you see a raid here. below, philadelphia. omaha. this is just to give you a flavor of some of the sort of spread of the party. so i want to close with just a couple words about, about why and what that might say more generally about insurgent movements. you know, there's different kinds of politics, and a lot of political power is built from below and people n, and they work with each other, and they do organizing work. and, um, but there are only, there are limits to those kinds of power and those kind of organizing. institutionalized power usually is used to build and consolidate power for people in charge of those institutions. and so there are many moments in history where people have been able to make a transformative change not through the slow process of networking and o
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 1:40pm EDT
under which the fbi was dispatched to find in latin america. the problem is the people who were sent to speak german or spanish and didn't know much about countries where they were supposed to find bad guys. so they did what any of us would do. start by presidents and offering money for information and they were at the nazis? that open up a system riddled with corruption for latin american dictators realized this german who owns a farm is a nazi. take them away. 4000 people of german origin put them in a candid texas as suspect the nazis. producing commanders started writing saying who are you sending us? i found 80 jewish who had fled germany, were picked up because someone's heard them speaking german them up in a can. some of them knew it was late to the behind barbed wire. it is a case that in some ways is a precursor to the guantÁnamo is in. that is the use of bounty hunters on local sources that do not teach and to run the people as terrorists who were then locked up in a system deliberately placed outside a judicial review and only as the years pass to realize because so
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2013 5:00pm EDT
are our relations with the private sector? how do we organize ourselves with the nsa and the fbi where where -- who is doing what so a lot of time being spent organizing ourselves even as we work with the congress on revisiting cybersecurity legislation. >> -- says you are trying to higher 600 workers, is that true? >> not just hackers but others others -- exactly. we have identified our immediate needs of our 600 more than we currently have so we are in that process now. secondly, immigration and all of the attendant issues. as you know, one of the major changes we made during dhs 2.0 was to prioritize immigration enforcement to really focus on those who would violate criminal laws in addition to who are repeat violators are who we caught at the borders where they got into the interior of the country. as we moved to high priorities we also started looking at things that are low priority and that led to a memo i sent to the director of i.c.e. and the direct or of g.i.'s last summer in june deferring action on qualified young people who would come to our process and go through a b
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 8:00pm EDT
support the possibility of a program was lost to history that the fbi was dispatched to find a dangerous teetwo and those who were said did not speak german or spanish and did not know much about the country's so you get your expense account and start buying presents and go to the chief of police. that opened a system that was riddled with corruption that latin-american dictators and realized if you want the veto -- t2 take him away. then i can take his land we'll bring 4,000 people of german origin to put them in a camp in texas when i discovered in the archives pretty soon commanders would say who is sending us? the spanish speakers 80 jews fled germany for asylum are picked up because of the herd them speaking german and they were put in a camp somebody knew what it was light to live behind barbed wire and in some ways it was the precursor to guantanamo with the use of bounty hunters to round up people that they are suspected as terrorists that are locked up in the system outside of judicial review but as the years passed we realized we have the wrong people. >> host: back t
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 10:30am EDT
brady operation or after the fbi received additional information. the last two categories are clearly possible to not meet the federal guideline to include people you thought had committed a crime. the reason you initially denied them so they can have a criminal background or some other problem and that they still try to buy a gun. it could be virtually all of the other individuals who were false positives and even after those after we had the 94% drop, about 20% of the remaining 6% are clearly false positives by surveys they did in 2004. if you look at just 2010, 62 cases of 76,000 were eventually referred to prostitution. 18 of those were declined by the 44 and they ended up with 1,376,000. so here's the deal you have there. when you're talking about 1.7 million people initially denied, a lot of this may simply be in convenience for. they eventually going to buy a gun. but when you're dealing with such a large number were, the problem you face is that it may be small, but it's a significant number of people who felt a need to get it done quickly for self-defense. people were being s
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2013 6:00am EDT
, frankly the fbi general counsel's office and its problems that i think are general to other general counsel's in the intelligence community as well as doj. and that is really three particular areas that i'm going to focus on. the jones decision from last year going dark which i will describe for those he don't know what that entails, and the problems with cyber initiatives that are going on. and all those i think are examples of the challenges of new technology when we have old law. i think when i look at this, give you my frame of reference when i'm approaching these. i think of a 19th century as industrial revolution i think the 20 century as modern medicine. i think of the 21st century even though we're only 13 years into it as the age of new technology. and the problem i see is that you have 19th, 18th, 17th century borders. you have nationstates with their individual laws, that you have crime that is transcending all that. and so we are wrestling with how do you do with those anomalies and how do you update the law to kc those tensions in a variety of ways. before i turn to jon
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 11:30pm EDT
in a suit seemed to her like an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely she made her way across the lobby into the elevator. at sitting on the seventh floor she spotted a man peering out of one of the doors in the hallway. another man entered the elevator with her and followed her around. suddenly come agents burst out of every room on the floor and converged on hirsh jogging arthu angela davis, are you angela davis? one of them pulled a gun. moments before she realized her capture was eminent, an unexpected unexpected sense of koln. as she pictured the corpse on the hallway carpeting they brought her to the fbi headquarters on east 69th street where she was kept for several hours before driven downtown to the house of detention on sixth avenue and greenwich avenue. esf ten story building the jefferson library stands there now that loom over the town houses and the tenants of the village disoriented as she was coming angeles still recognized it. she had walked by countless times on her way as a teenager and vividly recalled the female inmates as they brought down courses from the ja
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 6:00pm EDT
fbi gave to the british by aberration in america. they preferred a code name that had its root in sherlock holmes gifted amateurs that heated sherlock holmes and his inquiry and the british heard that and referred to themselves as the irregulars. the truth of what they were up to in washington during world war ii is also very tricky to write about because you are writing about spies so you are writing about people who are gifted lawyers would be a polite way to put it to say that they were trained in the arts of deception and of vacation monday and understatement. as a result, when it came to the post war memoirs and interviews they varied widely and meandered often from the truth and it was difficult to almost take anything they said at face value. so unlike many of the books i couldn't take the transcript such interviews and rely on them as wholley factual. with that said, the blame for much of the of gestation and the story lies with the head of the baker street irregulars, the british security court nation. he was a particularly colorful character named william stevenson a can
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 2:00pm EDT
fugitive had taken its toll. at this point every white man in a suit seemed to her like an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely, she made her way across the lobby and into the elevator. exiting the seventh floor, she spied a man peering out of one of the doors, another man who had entered the elevator with her followed her out. suddenly, agents burst out of every room and corn verged -- converged on her shouting, are you angela davis? one of hem pulled a gun. moments before when angela realized her capture was imminent, an unexpected sense of calm possessed her. now there was a sickening moment of terror as she pictured her corpse bleeding on the hallway carpeting. they brought her to the sterile fbi headquarters on east 69 street where she was kept for several hours before being driven downtown to the women's house of detention on sixth avenue and greenwich avenue, a massive 10-story brick building -- the jefferson library stands there now -- that loomed over the townhouses and tenements of greenwich village. disor credibilitied as she was -- disoriented as she was, angela still re
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2013 8:00pm EDT
, fbi commute dha, treasury, order patrol agents. these people are hugely dedicated people fighting this fight her to shoulder with us. we have to acknowledge the fact they are not in uniform but these don't wear military uniforms. they do it very, very tough job, but they're overwhelmed us to points out the intricacies and efficiency of this networking, ruthlessness of it. we need to remember the true heroes in every sense of the word. >> these are not only ruthless, all server that lets because the amounts of money are so huge and i agree with you that are civilian non-person in authority, which had a prior point in our history would've been relying on completely to combat networks now has been out and an outmanned in our research research by this criminal networks, so we've relied increasingly on the network you and the men and women into your command have done. i wonder whether you feel either more resources to them for more coordination with you is perhaps an answer to dealing with these networks. >> if i understand the question, i'm a believer in the away game. i go back to the eff
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 12:00pm EDT
estimated to top $5 trillion. then the fbi's top lawyer on how law enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. >> let's go straight to a personal topic. you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since i believe 2009. his term is a. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some term over at the commission speak what you should always see turnout because we all have staggered terms. the past six years have flown by very quickly, and we shall see. i get asked this question every couple of years and we've been almost seven years. i multiply thinking about but we shall see. >> thinking about what? >> what to do next. i have thought about that several times, what comes after the commission. a limited government personnel i think it should stay in the positions forever. at the same time i love my job. that's part of what is keeping me here and we have a lot of important work to do. spent this past week both co
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)